USS ENTERPRISE
CVN 65
  
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The eighth Enterprise (CVN 65), the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, was launched September 24, 1960, by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Va.; sponsored by Mrs. William. B. Franke, wife of the Secretary of the Navy; and commissioned November 25, 1961, Capt. V. P. de Poix, in command.

After commissioning, USS Enterprise began a lengthy series of tests and training exercises, designed to determine the full capabilities of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier.

The first air operations were conducted by CVN 65 as Cmdr. George Talley made an arrested landing and catapult launch in an F8U Crusader. Although three TF Traders of VR-40 had taken off from her deck on October 30, 1961, to transport VIPs to the mainland after observing sea trials, Cmdr. Talley's flights marked the start of Enterprise fleet operations. One month later, on February 20, 1962, the nuclear-powered carrier played a role in the space age when USS Enterprise acted as a tracking and measuring station for the epochal flight of Friendship 7, the Project Mercury space capsule in which Lt. Col. John H. Glenn, Jr., USMC, made the United States first orbital space flight.

In August, Big E joined the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean. Soon after its return to Norfolk, Va., in October 1962, Enterprise was dispatched to its first international crisis. On a televised address to the nation on October 22, President John F. Kennedy annouced that U.S. reconnaissance flights had revealed a Soviet buildup of offensive missiles on the island of Cuba, 90 miles off the Florida coast. The President ordered a naval and air quarantine on shipment of offensive military equipment to Cuba and demanded the Soviets dismantle the missile sites there.

As the President imposed the blockade of Cuba which he had announced in his TV broadcast two days earlier, ships of the blockading force were in position at sea. Aircraft from USS Enterprise, USS Independence, USS Essex and USS Randolph, and those from shore stations were in the air, patrolling their assigned sectors. On the same day the service tours of all officers and enlisted men were extended indefinitely.

USS Enterprise and other ships in the Second Fleet set up a "strict quarantine of all offensive military equipment under shipment to Cuba." The blockade was put in place on Oct. 24, and the first Soviet ship was stopped the next day. On Oct. 28, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove the missiles and dismantle the missile bases in Cuba.

On December 19, 1962, an E-2A piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Lee M. Ramsey was catapulted off the Enterprise in the first shipboard test of nose-tow gear designed to replace the catapult bridle and reduce launching intervals. Minutes later the second nose-tow launch was made by an A-6A.

USS Enterprise made its first major deployment to the Mediterranean in 1963. During the second deployment, on May 13, 1964, the world's first nuclear-powered task force was formed when USS Long Beach (CGN 9) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25) joined Enterprise. On July 31, the ships were designated Task Force One and, leaving Gibraltar, sailed on Operation Sea Orbit, an historic 65-day, 30,216-mile voyage around the world, accomplished without a single refueling or replenishment. CVAN 65 entered the dry-dock at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company on Nov. 2 for its first refueling and overhaul. The Enterprise returned to Norfolk Naval Station July 9, 1965.

The "Big E" transferred to the Pacific's Seventh Fleet in November 1965 and became the first nuclear-powered ship to engage in combat when it launched bomb-laden aircraft in a projection of power against the Viet Cong near Bien Hoa on December 2. Commanding Officer of "Screaming Shrikes" of Attack Squadron (VA) 94, Cmdr. O. E. Krueger, became the first pilot of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9 to enter combat. USS Enterprise launched 125 sorties on the first day, unleashing 167 tons of bombs and rockets on the enemy's supply lines. The next day it set a record of 165 strike sorties in a single day. By the end of the year USS Enterprise lost four Phantoms, two Skyhawks and one Vigilante. Three pilots and one flight officer were lost over North Vietnam.

April 14, 1966 USS Enterprise arrived at Leyet Pier for a six-day port visit to Subic Bay, Philippines, its fifth overall. On April 29 Lt. Cmdr. Scott Grey flew the ship's 10,000th strike. On May 20 the aircraft carrier anchored in Manila Bay after evading Typhoon Irma for three days. The Enterprise began its fifth and last line period May 23, on Yankee Station. On June 5 the record-breaking first combat tour was over. 13,020 combat sorties had been made and 8,000 tons of ordnance had been dumped on targets in South and North Vietnam.

On June 30, the Enterprise mooved to San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard at Hunters Point for repair and overhaul. CVAN 65 returned to Naval Air Station Alameda Sept. 2.

December 18, 1966 USS Enterprise launched its first combat sorties during the second Vietnam deployment. The aircraft carrier departed Pearl Harbor Nov. 28.

When Enterprise departed the line June 20, 1967, her pilots had flown more than 13,400 combat sorties in South and North Vietnam.

July 11, Capt. Kent L. Lee relieved Capt. James L. Holloway as commanding officer of USS Enterprise during a ceremony aboard the ship at Alameda, Calif.

On January 23, 1968, when word was received of the capture of USS Pueblo (AGER 2) by a North Korean patrol boat, a Task Group, composed of Enterprise and screen, was ordered to reverse course in the East China Sea and to run northward to the Sea of Japan where it operated in the vicinity of South Korea for almost a month. On Feb. 22 the Enterprise launched its first combat sorties from Yankee Station and on June 26 began the voyage home.

On July 29, USS Enterprise arrived at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash., for a two-month overhaul. The ship returned to NAS Alameda Sept. 30.

November 16, An HC-1 Helicopter was lost at sea, off the coast of southern California; pilot recovered but died later.

January 14, 1969 On its way to the coast of Vietnam, 70nm. of Honolulu, the Enterprise conducted flight operations. During the arming of an F-4 Phantom one of the aircraft's Zuni missiles detonated. The fire was spreading to other armed planes and some of their bombs and missiles detonated, too. USS Enterprise turned into the wind to keep the flames away from the isle.One hour later the fire on the flight deck was under control but there were still fires inside the ship which were finally extinguished some hours later. During the eight explosions and the following fires aboard Enterprise, 27 crewmen were killed and approx. 120 others were injured (other sources: 24 dead men and 85 injured people).The aircraft carrier was heavily damaged and in the flight deck there were three holes (one of them through two decks). 15 aircraft were destroyed or damaged.

On March 11, USS Enterprise departed Hawaiian area of operations to continue its WESTPAC deployment.

On April 14, North Korean aircraft shot down an unarmed EC-121 propeller-driven Constellation which was on a routine reconnaissance patrol over the Sea of Japan from its base at Atsugi, Japan. The entire 31-man crew was killed. U.S. response was to activate Task Force 71 to protect such flights over those international waters in the future. Initially, the TF consisted of the carriers USS Enterprise, USS Ticonderoga, USS Ranger and USS Hornet with cruiser and destroyer screens.

July 8, Capt. F. S. Petersen relieved Capt. Kent L. Lee as CO of the CVAN 65. On Aug. 12 Enterprise arrived at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Va., for its second refueling and overhaul. On Oct. 11 transited to Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company.

On January 19, 1971, USS Enterprise completed sea trials with her newly-designed nuclear reactor cores which contained enough energy to power her for the next 10-13 years. CVAN 65 returned to Alameda, Calif., March 18.

In Vietnam, with USS Oriskany, USS Midway and USS Enterprise serving intermittently on station, a total of 22 two-carrier days and nine single-carrier days resulted in a strike sortie count of 2,001 on July 30. Strike operations during the month of July were disrupted when the carriers on station evaded three different typhoons: Harriet, Kim and Jean. A slight increase in South Vietnam strike sorties occurred during the month. These were mainly visual strikes against enemy troop positions and in support of U.S. helicopter operations.

During August 1971, dual carrier operations were conducted only during the first week and, as of August 16, "Big E" filled in the remainder of the month alone on station. Thus, a total of eight two-carrier days and 23 single-carrier days represented a near reversal of July's carrier mix, producing a strike sortie count for the month of 1,915.

Single carrier operations on Yankee Station were conducted throughout September, except for one two-carrier day. The schedule had the Enterprise flying the first four days, Oriskany the middle of the month and Midway completing the last four days. The single carrier posture, combined with the low intended sortie rate, produced 1,243 strike sorties during the month. The Oriskany flyers participated in a joint USAF/USN protective reaction strike in southern North Vietnam on Sept. 21.

On Yankee Station during October, single carrier operations were conducted except for the last day. Midway completed her final line period October 10, with USS Enterprise taking over the next day for the remainder of the month. Oriskany joined the last day, and together the three carriers recorded a total of 1,024 ordnance-delivering strike sorties, 30 of them in South Vietnam; the remainder in Laos. The air warfare posture in North Vietnam was altered October 20 through the deployment of six MiG aircraft south of 20º north: two each at Vinh, Quan Lang and Bai Thuong.

November 6, USS Enterprise pulled into Singapore for a 10-day port visit.

Alternating on Yankee Station, Oriskany, Constellation and Enterprise provided 22 two-carrier days on the line during November, delivering 1,766 ordnance-bearing strike sorties, twelve and nine of them into North Vietnam and South Vietnam respectively. Two reconnaissance missions were flown during the month, with the airfield at Vinh the mission assignment. Escort aircraft on both missions expended ordnance in a protective reaction role against firing antiaircraft artillery sites near the field. Other protective reaction strikes were executed.

December 3, Capt. E. E. Tissot, Jr., relieved Capt. F. S. Petersen as commanding officer of the Enterprise during a ceremony aboard the ship in the Gulf of Tonkin.

March 15, 1972 USS Enterprise pulled into San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard at Hunters Point for a two-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

September 24, CVAN 65 arrived at Naval Air Station Cubi Point for a four-day visit to Subic Bay, Philippines.

On October 23, 1972, the U.S. ended all tactical air sorties into North Vietnam above the 20th parallel and brought to a close Linebacker I operations. This goodwill gesture of terminating the bombing in North Vietnam above the 20th parallel was designed to help promote the peace negotiations being held in Paris, France. During May through October, the Navy flew a total of 23,652 tactical air attack sorties into North Vietnam. U.S. tactical air sorties during Linebacker I operations helped stem the flow of supplies into North Vietnam, thereby limiting the operating capabilities of North Vietnam's invading army. Carriers involved in Linebacker I operations were USS Enterprise, USS Constellation, USS Coral Sea, USS Hancock, USS Kitty Hawk, USS Midway, USS Saratoga, USS Oriskany, and USS America.

During the Oct. 23 through Dec. 17 bombing halt above the 20th parallel in North Vietnam, no MiG kills or U.S. losses were recorded. Three to four carriers alternated on Yankee Station during the bombing halt. These were: Enterprise, Kitty Hawk, Midway, Saratoga, Oriskany, America and Ranger.

December 17, The first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed Hong Kong after a six-day port call.

Linebacker II operations were initiated on December 18, when negotiations in the Paris peace talks stalemated. The Linebacker II operations ended on 29th when the North Vietnamese returned to the peace table. These operations involved the resumed bombing of North Vietnam above the 20th parallel and was an intensified version of Linebacker I. The reseeding of mine fields in Haiphong harbor was resumed and concentrated strikes were carried out against surface-to-air missile and antiaircraft artillery sites, enemy army barracks, petroleum storage areas, Haiphong naval and shipyard areas, and railroad and truck stations. Navy tactical air attack sorties under Linebacker II were centered in the coastal areas around Hanoi and Haiphong. There were 705 Navy sorties in this area during Linebacker II.

Between December 18-22, the Navy conducted 119 Linebacker II strikes in North Vietnam. Bad weather was the main limiting factor on the number of tactical air strikes flown during this operation. On December 28, an F-4J Phantom II from VF-142 on board Enterprise downed a MiG-21, the 24th downed by Navy and Marine Corps pilots dureing the Vietnam War. The following carriers participated in Linebacker II operations: USS Enterprise, USS Saratoga, USS Oriskany, USS America and USS Ranger.

On January 27, 1973, the Vietnam cease-fire, announced four days earlier, came into effect and Oriskany, America, Enterprise and Ranger on Yankee Station, cancelled all combat sorties into North and South Vietnam. However, on 28th, aircraft from the Enterprise and Ranger flew 81 combat sorties against lines-of-communication targets in Laos. The corridor for overflights was between Hue and Da Nang in South Vietnam. These combat support sorties were flown in support of the Laotian government which had requested this assistance and it had no relationship with the cease-fire in Vietnam. On April 6, while underway en route to NAS Cubi Point, one crewman was lost at sea. The aircraft carrier departed Subic Bay April 15. USS Enterprise arrived again in Subic Bay on May 10 for 10 days of R&R.

Following the cease-fire in Vietnam, CVAN 65 proceeded to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., on July 30 for the six-month Extended Selected Restricted Availability (ESRA), where she was altered and refitted to support the Navy's newest fighter aircraft - the F-14A Tomcat. The first operational aircraft made its maiden landings and take-offs from the "Big E" on March 18, 1974.

April 9, Capt. C. C. Smith relieved Rear Adm. E. E. Tissot as CO of the Enterprise.

September 17, USS Enterprise departed NAS Alameda for its seventh western Pacific deployment and is the first aircraft carrier to deploy with the new F-14A.

November 18, CVN 65 pulled into Hong Kong for a six-day port visit.

December 24, The Enterprise arrived at Naval Air Station Cubi Point for a two-week port visit, its third to Subic Bay.

On January 13, 1975, an EA-6B was lost at sea just 15 seconds after launch. One crewman died.

On February 9, USS Enterprise responded to calls for disaster relief from the island nation of Mauritius which was struck on February 6 by Typhoon Cervaise. Arriving at Port Louis on the 12th, carrier personnel spent more than 10,000 man-hours rendering such assistance as restoring water, power and telephone systems, clearing roads and debris, and providing helicopter, medical, food and potable water support to the stricken area.

USS Enterprise (CVN 65), along with USS Midway, USS Coral Sea, USS Hancock, and USS Okinawa deployed to waters off Vietnam on April 19 for possible evacuation contingencies as North Vietnam overran two-thirds of South Vietnam and pronounced the carriers' presence a brazen challenge and a violation of the 1973 Paris Peace Accords. Ten days later, on 29th, in a period of three hours, Operation Frequent Wind was carried out by U.S. Navy and Marine Corps helicopters from the Seventh Fleet. Frequent Wind involved the evacuation of American citizens from the capital of South Vietnam under heavy attack from the invading forces of North Vietnam. The military situation around Saigon and its Tan Son Nhut airport made evacuation by helicopter the only way out. President Gerald Ford ordered the evacuation when Viet Cong shelling forced the suspension of normal transport aircraft use at Tan Son Nhut airport. With fighter cover provided by carrier aircraft, the helicopters landed on Saigon rooftops and at Tan Son Nhut to evacuate the Americans. The airport became the main helicopter landing Zone: it was defended by Marines from the 9th Amphibious Brigade flown in for that purpose. All but a handful of the 900 Americans in Saigon were evacuated. The last helicopter lifted off the roof of the United States Embassy at 7:52 p.m. carrying Marine security guards. During Operation Frequent Wind, USS Enterprise aircraft flew 95 sorties. One A-7E was lost due to undertermined causes. CVN 65 returned to homeport May 20.

October 29, While aboard the CVN 65 the engine of an F-14 of VF-124 started burning and destroyed the plane.

USS Enterprise completed the four-month SRA Nov. 7 and returned to NAS Alameda December 15.

April 3, 1976 An A-7E from VA-125 crashed while attempting an arrested landing on the Big E. The Corsair II struck the round down, sheered off its starboard landing gear strut, continued down the flight deck and went off the bow. Although no aircraft were hit, a member of the Air Department and the pilot of the A-7 were killed.

July 30, USS Enterprise departed Naval Air Station Alameda for its 10th deployment.

September 6, The Enterprise pulled into Subic Bay, Philippines, for an 18-day port visit.

October 29, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Hobart, Tasmania, for a week-long port visit after participating in a multinational exercise Kangoroo II.

November 29, USS Enterprise anchored in Victoria Harbour for a four-day visit to Hong Kong.

December 10, Capt. J. W. Austin relieved Capt. C. C. Smith, Jr., as commanding officer of the Enterprise at NAS Cubi Point. CVN 65 departed Subic Bay Dec. 13 after 8-day visit.

December 19, An F-14A of VF-2 was lost at sea, three miles ahead of the ship, after experiencing flight control malfunction while attempting to land on CVN 65. The crew ejected safely.

January 14, 1977 USS Enterprise departed Naval Air Station Cubi Point after more than a two-week port call.

February 19, The aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Mombasa, Kenya, for a three-day port visit.

March 28, USS Enterprise returned to Alameda, Calif., after eight-month deployment, steaming more than 64,000 n.m.

May 11, CVN 65 started a 10-week Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) while pierside at NAS Alameda's Pier 3 South.

August 19, The Enterprise departed homeport for a "Dependents Day Cruise."

September 2, The aircraft carrier pulled into Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, for a four-day port call to celebrate the Labor Day weekend.

April 4, 1978 USS Enterprise departed Alameda for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

June 12, The Enterprise arrived in Hong Kong for a five-day port visit.

August 7, CVN 65 arrived in Fremantle, Australia, for a five-day visit to Perth. The carrier arrived in Singapore Aug. 19 for a three-day port call.

August 26, USS Enterprise pulled into NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, for a three-week upkeep period.

October 30, USS Enterprise returned to homeport after a six-day Tiger Cruise from Pearl Harbor, completing the 9th WESTPAC deployment.

January 11, 1979 USS Enterprise entered the Dry Dock 6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash., for a Complex Overhaul (COH). The aircraft carrier moved from dry-dock to Pier 3 on Sept. 30. The work was scheduled to be completed by mid-September 1980 and includes the instalation of two NATO Sea Sparrow Surface Missile Systems (NSSMS) and three General Dynamics PLALANX Close-In Weapons Systems (CIWS).

February 23, 1980 Capt. R. J. Kelly relieved Capt. J. W. Austin as CO of CVN 65 during a change-of-command ceremony at the forecastle of the ship.

Throughout 1981, USS Enterprise remained at PSNS's Pier 3. Although conventional overhaul items and equipment were installed or work completed, continuing intricate testing of the ship's reactor equipment extended the overhaul into 1982.

In May 1981, the Enterprise saw helicopter operations on the flight deck for the first time in over 2 years.

February 2, 1982 USS Enterprise departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for sea trials after an extended three-year overhaul. CVN 65 returned to NAS Alameda Feb. 13.

September 1, USS Enterprise departed home for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

September 13, The aircraft carrier pulled into Pearl Harbor for a four-day port call after conducting a joint Ship ASW Readines Evaluation Measuring (SHAREM) and Air Readines Evaluation Measuring (AIREM) exercise, Sept. 7-12.

October 25, The Big "E" pulled into Singapore for a four-day port visit. CVN 65 also visited Subic Bay, Philippines, Oct. 14-18.

November 6, Cmdr. Robert P. Hickey relieved Cmdr. F. L. Tillotson as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11.

November 22, USS Enterprise anchored off the coast of Mombasa, Kenya, for a five-day port visit.

January 20, 1983 The Enterprise arrived in Fremantle, Australia, for a six-day visit to Perth.

February 27, CVN 65 departed Naval Air Station Cubi Point after a three-week upkeep port call.

March 21, USS Enterprise arrived in Sasebo, Japan, for a five-day port visit, the first since 1968. The carrier returned to San Francisco Bay April 28. During the final leg of the inbound channel, approximately half a mile from the pier, USS Enterprise run aground and was delayed for five hours until the incoming tide and tugs freed her. While deployed the Air Wing flew approximately 29,000 hours and recorded over 11,000 traps.

June 17, Capt. R. L. Leuschner, Jr., relieved Capt. R. J. Kelly as commanding officer of the Big "E" during a ceremony on board the ship.

September 26, The Enterprise returned to NAS Alameda after a six-day sea trials, completing the four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

March 3, 1984 The first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed homeport for Dependents Day Cruise.

May 30, USS Enterprise departed Naval Air Station Alameda for its 13th mayor deployment.

June 15, CVN 65 arrived in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a four-day port call after participating in a multinational exercise RIMPAC '84.

July 24, USS Enterprise pulled into Subic Bay for a nine-day port visit to NAS Cubi Point. The Big "E" visited Hong Kong Aug. 6-11.

August 24, USS Enterprise arrived on station in the North Arabian Sea to relieved USS America (CV 66).

November 12, The aircraft carrier arrived in Subic Bay for a week-long port call after 93 day at-sea period.

December 13, The enterprise departed Pearl Harbor after a three-day visit, embarking 900 male "Tigers". During the deployment the Air Wing flew over 25,000 hours and recorded over 9100 traps.

August 17, 1985 CVN 65 departed homeport for a Dependents' Day Cruise near Farallon Islands.

On Nov. 2, while operating south-southwest of San Diego, the Enterprise struk a portion of "Bishop Rock". After evaluation of the damages caused to the hull, the carrier continued scheduled training, returning to NAS Alameda Nov. 23. The ship entered the dry-dock at Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard Nov. 28 for repairs. CVN 65 returned to homeport Jan. 7.

January 12, 1986 USS Enterprise departed Alameda, Calif., for its 14th deployment.

January 28, Capt. Robert J. Spane relieved Capt. R. L. Leuschner, Jr., as CO of the CVN 65.

January 29, The Enterprise pulled into Pearl Harbor for a four-day port call.

February 17, The aircraft carrier arrived at NAS Cubi Point for a week-long port call. On Feb. 14, an F-14A from VF-213 was lost due to fuel starvation, nearly 500 n.m. from the Battle Group. Crews recovered.

March 8, An A-7E from VA-97 crashed while on final approach due to engine malfunction. Pilot recovered. The Enterprise departed Singapore March 5 affter a three-day visit.

March 15, USS Enterprise arrived in Karachi, Pakistan, for a four-day port visit. On March 22 the carrier anchored off the coast of Masirah Island, Oman, and spend the next 16 days in and out of Al Masirah operating in North Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Oman.

On April 29, the ship transited Suez Canal to relieve USS Coral Sea, on station with USS America off the coast of Libya. The transit began at 0402 and lasted unti 1514 local time. It was the first time in over 22 years that CVN 65 was in the Mediterranean Sea.

May 8, USS Enterprise arrived in Naples, Italy, for an eight-day port visit.

June 9, The aircraft carrier departed Toulon, France, after a nine-day port call. Conducted turnover with USS Forrestal (CV 59) on June 17 after supporting NATO Tridente exercise.

June 23, USS Enterprise anchored again in Augusta Bay, Sicily, for a two-day visit. The ship departed Mediterranean Sea June 28.

July 13, An EA-6B from VS-21 was lost after cat shot, following control malfunction. Crew was recovered and mission commander landed on the flight deck after ejection.

July 18, The Enterprise arrived in Fremantle, Australia, for a four-day visit to Perth.

August 13, USS Enterprise returned to Naval Air Station Alameda after a seven-month deployment in the U.S. 6th and 7th Fleet AoR.

September 22, CVN 65 entered the dry-dock at Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard for a DSRA. The Enterprise returned to Alameda March 10, 1987.

July 29, USS Enterprise arrived in Seattle, Wash., for a five-day port visit to participate in Sea Fair celebration.

November 2, PO2 Marble (Air Dept) accidentally killed on a flight deck by E-2 Hawkeye propeller, while the carrier was en route to Gulf of Alaska for NORPAC Ops.

January 5, 1988 USS Enterprise departed NAS Alameda for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

January 16, An A-7 from VA-22 was lost when slided off the elevator #2 during respot. Plane Captain died. Another A-7 from VS-22 was lost on Jan. 19 as it departed during DACM. Pilot recovered uninjured.

February 6, The aircraft carrier departed Subic Bay, Philippines after a five-day port call.

February 17, CVN 65 relieved USS Midway (CV 41) on station in the North Arabian Sea.

March 15, USS Enterprise anchored off the coast of Mombasa, Kenya, for a four-day port visit. On March 28th the Big "E" anchored near Masirah Island for standdown. On April 3rd anchored again off the coast of Al Masirah for Easter.

In April, the Big "E" was assigned to escort reflagged Kuwaiti oil tankers in the Arabian Gulf while stationed in the North Arabian Sea. On April 18, the United States retaliated against Iran following the April 14 incident in which USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) struck an Iranian mine in international waters. The retaliation involved both surface and air units. Carrier Air Wing 11 squadrons from Enterprise were the major aviation participants. VAW-117s "Nighthawks" provided airborne early warning tracking and analysis of targets as as air intercept control. The initial American strikes centered around a surface group action against two Iranian oil platforms that had been identified as support bases for Iranian attacks on merchant shipping. Elements of CVW-11 provided air support for the surface groups in the form of surface combat air patrols, flying A-6E Intruders and A-7E Corsair IIs, and combat air patrols with F-14 Tomcats.

June 5, An S-3 from VS-21 crashed immediately after a catapult shot, killing three crewman including CO of the "Fighting Redtails". The aircraft carrier made its second visit to NAS Cubi Point June 1-4.

June 6, USS Enterprise anchored in Hong Kong harbor for a four-day port visit. The carrier arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, June 14 for a three-day visit.

June 28, CVN 65 pulled into Seattle, Wash., to pick up 1300 "Tigers". USS Enrerprise returned home July 3.

October 28, Capt. Harry T. Rittenour relieved Capt. Robert J. Spane as CO of the Enterprise during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

April 13, 1989 USS Enterprise departed Alameda for sea trials after a six-month SRA.

June 8-9, Paramount Studios came onborad to film scenes for movie "The Hunt for Red October" while the carrier was conducting CQ off the coast of southern California.

September 17, USS Enterprise departed Naval Air Station Alameda for the last time to its new homeport of Naval Station Norfolk, Va.

October 31, The Enterprise arrived in Hong Kong for a week-long port call.

November 11, The aircraft carrier moored starboard side at Leyete Pier on NAS Cubi Point for a 17-day upkeep period.

In early December CVN 65 participated in Operation Classic Resolve, along with USS Midway, President George H.W. Bush's response to Philippine President Corazon Aquino's request for air support during the rebel coup attempt. The Enterprise remained on station conducting flight operations in the waters outside Manila Bay, until the situation subsided, and then proceeded to her scheduled deployment to the Indian Ocean.

December 14, USS Enterprise anchored off the coast of Ko Chun Island for a five-day visit to Pattaya Beach, Thailand.

December 22, The "Big E" pulled into Singapore for a six-day port visit. CVN 65 arrived on station in the North Arabian Sea on January 13, 1990.

February 18, USS Enterprise arrived in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for a five-day port visit.

March 5, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier arrived in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, for a four-day visit.

March 16, USS Enterprise completed a six-month around-the-world deployment by arriving in Norfolk, Va., after a three-day Tiger Cruise from Port Everglades, Fla. She had successfully and safely steamed more than 43,000 miles from her long-time homeport of Alameda, Calif.

July 20, The "Big E" departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Dependents Day Cruise Airshow.

October 12, USS Enterprise moved to Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, 18 days earlier than scheduled to avoid Hurricane Lili, for refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH). CVN 65 entered the Dry Dock 11 on March 16, 1991.

August 7, 1991 Capt. Daniel C. Roper relieved Capt. Harry T. Rittenour as CO of the Enterprise during a change-of-command ceremony at the Mariner's Museum in Newport News.

December 14, 1992 USS Enterprise moved to Pier 2 at Newport News Shipbuilding after a 21-month dry-dock period.

August 27, 1993 Capt. Richard J .Naughton relieved Capt. Daniel C. Roper as CO of the CVN 65.

September 27, 1994 USS Enterprise departed for sea trials after completing the four-year RCOH.

July 7, 1995 The first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier moved to Naval Station Norfolk after five-and-a-half month PSA/SRA at Newport News Shipbuilding.

September 16, The Enterprise departed homeport for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

October 9, CVN 65 pulled into Port Everglades for a three-day visit to Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

February 2, 1996 Capt. Michael D. Malone relieved Capt. Richard J. Naughton as CO of the Enterprise.

March 1, USS Enterprise pulled into St. Martin, Netherlands Antilles, for a three-day port visit. The "Big E" arrived in Port Everglades for a three-day visit on March 18.

June 28, USS Enterprise departed Norfolk, Va., for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility.

July 25, The Enterprise arrived in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a four-day port visit. CVN 65 arrived in Cannes, France, Aug. 5 for a four-day port call.

After a bief port call to Souda Bay, Crete, Greece, Enterprise participated in exercise Juniper Hawk, Aug. 22-29, and anchored off the coast of Haifa for a visit to Israel.

August 30, USS Enterprise arrived in Rhodes, Greece, for a five-day visit, then steamed into the Adriatic Sea to again support the "No-Fly Zone" over Bosnia-Herzegovina. The aircraft carrier transited Suez Canal Sept. 15. The Enterprise than participated for the first time in Operation Southern Watch (OSW), since she had been in overhaul during the first several years of the operation.

October 7, The Enterprise anchored off the coast of Sitra, Bahrain, for a four-day visit to Manama.

October 25, An HH-60H Helicopter from HS-15 was lost at sea. Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey A. Hilliard, Lt. Robert S. Wood, Jr., and Navy SEAL, Petty Officer 1st Class Steven M. Voight were killed. Nine other people survived.

November 4, USS Enterprise pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day visit to Dubai.

November 28, The "Big E" arrived in Naples, Italy, for a week-long Thanksgiving port visit.

December 20, USS Enterprise returned to Norfolk after a two-day Tiger Cruise from Bermuda, completing the six-month deployment. The aircraft carrier steamed 50,000 n.m. and visited 14 ports. CVW-17 flew more than 8,000 sorties. The deployment also marked the end of an era when VA-75 retired the A-6E Intruder from the U.S. Navy.

February 28, 1997 CVN 65 entered the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for a six-month Extended Selective Restrictive Availability (ESRA).

October 2, The Enterprise pulled into Mayport Naval Station for a four-day port call.

Octobere 6, USS Enterprise arrived in Port Everglades, Fla., for a six-day visit to participate in Broward County Navy Days. The final four days were spent at anchor.

October 18, The aircraft carrier departed Norfolk for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

November 10, Capt. Evan M. Chanik relieved Capt. Michael D. Malone sas commanding officer of the USS Enterprise.

December 11, An T-45A "Goshawk" splashed into the Atlantic Ocean shortly after take-off, during carrier qualifications (CQ) Dec. 3-15.

USS Enterprise completed additional CQ off the Virginia capes, Cherry Point and Jacksonville Operating Areas, from the June 8-18, 1988. The following month, CVN 65 began Comprehensive Training Underway Exercise (COMPTUEX), July 15- August 21. On Aug. 2 the Enterprise anchored just outside of St. Thomas Harbor for a four-day visit to Virgins Islands.

The Enterprise was conducting a three-week Joint Training Fleet Exercise (JTFEX), off the coast of North Carolina, Sept. 18- Oct. 5.

November 6, 1998 USS Enterprise departed Naval Station Norfolk's Pier 11 North for its 18th deployment. The ship spent the first four days of the deployment off the coast of Virginia, receiving and qualifying the air wing.

November 8, During night landing re-qualifications aboard USS Enterprise in the Atlantic Ocean, two jets collided. An EA6-B Prowler from VAQ-130 based at Whidbey Island collided with an S-3 Viking from VS-22 based at Jacksonville, Fla. The "Viking" was sitting on the flight deck, the Prowler then fell into the sea. The S-3 had just landed and was in the Prowler's path. The LSO's declared a Fouled Deck but the Prowler clipped the Viking as it attempted to go around. All six crew, four from the Prowler and two from the Viking ejected. The two from the S-3 were injured one landing into a radar on the ship's island, the other into the sea. The four crew of the Prowler were killed. Lt. Cmdr. Kurt W. Barich, Lt. j.g. Brendan J. Duffy, Lt. j.g. Charles E. Woodward and Lt. j.g. Meredith Loughran. One body was found and the other three missing presumed killed. The search was called off after 24 hours. The destroyed S-3B was subsequently jettisoned.

Following a high-speed Atlantic transit, the "Big E" relieved USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in the Arabian Gulf Nov. 23. The carrier transited Suez Canal Nov. 19.

December 4, USS Enterprise pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a five-day visit to Dubai.

On December 16, the Enterprise BG spearheaded Operation Desert Fox, smashing Iraqi military targets with more than 300 Tomahawk land attack missiles and 691,000 pounds of ordnance. The 70-hour assault from December 16-20 was accomplished by USS Enterprise, USS Gettysburg (CG 64), USS Stout (DDG 55), USS Nicholson (DD 982) and USS Miami (SSN 755). The Enterprise launched and recovered 297 combat sorties during 70 hours of operations, with Aircraft from CVW 3 dropping nearly 692,000 lb of ordnance, including 200 precision guided bombs, over 30 free-fall weapons and more than 80 anti-radiation missiles.

January 4, 1999 USS Entreprise pulled into Souda Bay, Crete, for a three-day port call.

January 14, CVN 65 arrived in Antalya, Turkey, for a four-day port visit. The aircraft carrier arrived in Livorno, Italy, Jan. 27 for a week-long visit.

After participating in NATO exercise INVITEX 99, in the Ionian and Tyrrhenian Seas, Feb. 8-17, USS Enterprise steamed westward for the French Riviera and the next liberty port, Cannes, France. However, as the crew streamed ashore just before lunchtime on Feb. 20, they were "well aware of the deteriorating situation in Kosovo," their fears confirmed barely three hours later when they beheld the emergency recall signal. The breakdown of the Ramboulliet Peace Talks and the approaching NATO ultimatum regarding Serbian withdrawal of their forces from Kosovo necessitated her immediate return. Early the next day the ship slipped her lines and began a full speed "run" toward the Adriatic.

February 27, USS Enterprise arrived in Trieste, Italy, for a three-day port visit. In early March an S-3B had an emergency landing in Ovda Airbase, Israel, where the crash and salvage team configured the Viking so that the damaged main mount could be repaired, installed, and "back up flying again." The Enterprise then participated in Juniper Stallion, an exercise with Israeli forces, March 7-12.

USS Enterprise transited the Suez Canal on March 14 and passed through the Bab al Mandeb into the Indian Ocean on March 16. Sailing through the Strait of Hormuz on the 19th, she entered the Arabian Gulf, "dodging uncharted oil rigs" and taking station in support of Southern Watch with Response Option strikes March 19-24.

The Enterprise visited Jebel Ali, U.A.E. March 25-28, where the deck department repainted the exterior of the ship. Clearing that harbor, the carrier conducted flight operations supporting Southern Watch through April 12.

The Big E" came about from the Arabian Gulf, navigating the Strait of Hormuz on April 13, relieved by USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63). Rounding the Arabian Peninsula and transiting the Bab al Mandeb on April 16, she passed through the Suez Canal on the 19th. After dropping off CVW-3 and embarking Tigers at Mayport, Fla., and pausing to assist in a Coast Guard SAR of a disabled civilian sailboat off the coast of North Carolina, USS Enterprise returned to Naval Station Norfolk on May 6 after steaming over 50,000 n.m. and completing 22 moorings and 25 anchorages. During the deployment CVW-3 launched and recovered 6,087 sorties. Over 2,000 aircraft launches were accomplished with live ordnance in support of Southern Watch and Desert Fox.

June 20, USS Enterprise entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a six-month ESRA.

January 16, 2001 CVN 65 departed homeport for a two-week Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

April 25, USS Enterprise departed Naval Station Norfolk for its 19th overseas deployment, with Carrier Air Wing Eight (CVW-8).

May 10, The Entreprise arrived in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a four-day port visit. The "Big E" visited Cannes, France, May 24-28.

June 4, The first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier arrived in Naples, Italy, for a three-day visit. CVN 65 departed Portsmouth, England, June 16 after a three-day visit.

USS Enterprise Battle Group ships participated in the Joint Maritime Course 01-2 (JMC 01-2), a British Royal Navy joint and combined warfare training exercise, June 18-28, in the North Sea near the Hebrides Islands, as well as land and airspace around Scotland.

July 2, The Enterprise pulled into Lisbon, Portugal, for a four-day port call to celebrate the Independence Day.

USS Enterprise visited Rhodes, Greece, July 20-23 and then entered the Persian Gulf to relieve USS Constellation (CV 64) in support of Operation Southern Watch.

August 25, CVN 65 pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day port call.

On Sept. 10, the Enterprise passed through the Strait of Hormuz en route Cape Town, South Africa. On September 11, watching a U.S. morning news show live, although locally in the early evening, the crew saw the terrorist attacks by the al Qaeda terrorist network against New York's World Trade Center and on the Pentagon. Immediately, CVN 65 turned around and headed back to the waters off Southwest Asia. She is the first ship to arrive on station 100 miles south of Pakistan. Over the next few weeks, USS Enterprise conducted combat flight operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom executing primarily night strike flight operations, including a period of 36 hours continuous of flight operations. During the 17 days, aircraft from CVW 8 flew around 660 missions in Afghanistan and dropped 829,150 pounds of ordnance.

October 28, The Enterprise transited Suez Canal after relieved by USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) on Oct. 25. The ship arrived in Souda Bay Oct. 29 for a brief port call.

November 10, USS Enterprise returned to Norfolk, Va., after six-and-a-half month deployment, about two weeks later than originally planned.

January 7, 2002 The "Big E" entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a scheduled one-year Extended Docking Selected Restricted Availability (EDSRA).

August 21, CVN 65 moved out of Dry Dock 8 and got water under its keel for the first time since January. Enterprise's next major phase in the EDSRA included getting all the ship's services back online, resurfacing the flight deck and getting the propulsion plants up and running.

May 6, 2003 USS Enterprise, commanded by Capt. Eric C. Neidlinger, departed NNSY for sea trials and returned to Naval Station Norfolk May 7.

May 9, CVN 65 departed for Flight Deck Certifications (FDC) and Carrier Qualifications (CQ); returned to Pier 12 South on May 27.

June 25, The Enterprise pulled into Mayport Naval Station for a brief port call, while participating in Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA). Returned to Norfolk July 1.

August 29, USS Enterprise departed Naval Station Norfolk for its maiden deployment for the Navy’s first Carrier Strike Group (CSG). The CSG, which includes Enterprise with its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), USS Gettysburg (CG 64), and USS Detroit (AOE 8), and more than 7,100 Sailors, will conduct a rigorous training cycle followed by an immediate routine deployment, in support of the Global War on Terrorism. The strike group will conduct graduate training exercises, including a CQ, TSTA III & FEP, Aug. 29- Sept. 9; and a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) until the end of September. The CSG is not currently scheduled to return to their homeport prior to deploying. The exercise, which begins Sept. 10, will utilize areas off the East Coast and the Gulf of Mexico, and will involve complex strike group training events, naval surface fire-support training and air-to-ground bombing as part of the Atlantic Fleet’s new training resource strategy. The Argentinean destroyer, ARA Sarandi (D 13), will join the Enterprise CSG for the COMPTUEX and part of the ensuing deployment.

October 13, USS Enterprise CSG entered the Red Sea after transiting Suez Canal. Participated in OIF, in the North Arabian Gulf, Oct. 24-30.

November 3, The Enterprise departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a three-day visit to Dubai. Participated in OEF/Mountain Resolve, in the North Arabian Sea, Nov. 5-15.

December 6, CVN 65 arrived again in Jebel Ali for a week-long port call. Participated in OIF and Iron Hammer, in the North Arabian Gulf, Nov. 16- Dec. 31.

December 21, The aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Manama for a five-day visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain.

During the first three-month of deployment the Air Wing executed over 3,500 sorties and 8,000 flight hours in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.

January 28, 2004 USS Enterprise recently finished a multinational maritime interdiction training exercise Sea Saber, a multination maritime interdiction training exercise held Jan. 11-17, to improve measures against the trafficking of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in the Northern Arabian Sea and Arabian Gulf.

February 5, The Carrier Strike Group entered the waters of Mediterranean Sea after transiting Suez Canal, following almost four months of operations in the Middle East.

February 29, USS Enterprise returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a six-month deployment in support of OIF and OEF.

April 20, The "Big E" is currently in the Atlantic Ocean conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQ).

April 30, USS Enterprise concluded a successful port visit to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., as guests of South Florida Fleet Week USA.

June 3, CVN 65 is currently participating in Summer Pulse 2004 in the Atlantic Ocean.

July 2, The Norfolk-based aircraft carrier pulled into Portsmouth, England, for a four-day port visit.

July 23, The Enterprise returned to Norfolk folloving its participation in Summer Pulse 2004.

September 3, The "Big E" entered the Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard for a scheduled Extended Selected Restricted Availability (ESRA).

October 9, 2005 CVN 65 departed Northrop Grumman Newport News, Va., for the first time since Sept. 2004 and returned to Naval Station Norfolk Pier 12N.

October 25, The Enterprise returned to Norfolk after a 10-day underway period for sea trials, Flight Deck Certification, Carrier Qualifications and ammunition onload bringing the aircraft carrier one step closer to combat readiness. The "Big E" utilized both connected replenishment (CONREP) and vertical replenishment (VERTREP) with the help of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11 to safely bring aboard 1,173 lifts of ammunition from USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8).

October 29, CVN 65 departed Naval Station Norfolk for Tailored Ships Training Assessment. TSTA is a training regimen designed to prepare a ship for prompt and sustained combat operations at sea.

November 3, USS Enterprise, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, USS Harry S. Truman and fast combat support ship USNS Arctic are currently underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting ammunition transfers and underway replenishments.

November 21, The Enterprise returned to homeport after successefuly concluding its Tailored Ship’s Training Availability and Final Evaluation Period (TSTA/FEP).

February 6, 2006 USS Enterprise is currently underway conducting routine carrier qualifications in the Atlantic Ocean.

February 27, The "Big E" and embarked Carrier Air Wing One (CVW 1) are currently underway conducting carrier qualification prior to starting Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

March 19, CVN 65 disembarked CVW-1, following the successful completion of COMPTUEX. It returned to Norfolk March 31.

May 2, USS Enterprise, commanded by Capt. Lawrence Rice, departed Norfolk for a scheduled deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

May 17, The Enterprise pulled to Split, Croatia, for a four-day port call.

May 23, USS Enterprise arrived in Souda Bay, Crete, for a routine port visit. While in the Naval Forces Europe Area of Responsibility, the Carrier Strike Group will conduct training and theater security cooperation engagements with several countries including Bulgaria, Germany, Croatia, and Greece.

May 29, CVN 65 ESG transited the Suez Canal to relieve USS Ronald Reagan on it's duty, in the 5th Fleet AoO, in the Persian Gulf.

July 6, USS Enterprise, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 successfully completed the first operational portion of their deployment. The carrier now heads to the western Pacific to begin operations with U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet. Since arriving in the Persian Gulf on June 6, CVW-1 launched 781 sorties and amassed 3,832 flight hours in direct support of troops participating in Operation Iraqi Freedom; and an additional 237 sorties and 455 flight hours in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

July 16, The "Big E" is currently in the Philippine Sea conducting dual carrier air operations with the USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63).

July 18, The Norfolk-based aircraft carrier arrived in Pusan, Korea, for a scheduled port visit.

August 1, USS Enterprise recently departed Hong Kong after a port call. She departed Changi Naval Base, Singapore, on Aug. 6 after a four-day port visit.

August 20, The "Big E" departed Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, after a four-day port call.

September 1, USS Enterprise and USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55) returned to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility Aug. 28, following nearly two months of operations with U.S. 7th Fleet in the western Pacific.

September 5, Aircraft assigned to Carrier Air Wing One provided support to International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) troops on the ground as part of Operation Medusa in Afghanistan that began Sept. 3. In concert with coalition air forces, F/A-18C Hornets from the “Sidewinders” of VFA-86, based in Beaufort, S.C., conducted precision strikes on a known Taliban position near Kandahar. Recently, Taliban extremists operating in the vicinity of Kandahar have employed new, more aggressive tactics, including suicide bombings on unprotected civilian targets. The Enterprise Strike Group is currently operating in the northern Arabian Sea in support of maritime security operations and Operation Enduring Freedom.

On Oct. 7, aircraft assigned to CVW 1, commanded by Capt. Mark Wralstad, participated in their second heaviest day of close air support in the skies over Afghanistan since they began operations in there early September. Eight GBU-12 weapons were expended in the attacks during the 36th day of support operations, Saturday, against Taliban extremist positions near Kandahar. In the 17 days since their heaviest day of close air support to ISAF troops and other coalition forces Sept. 20, the Enterprise-based aircraft have flown nearly 200 close air support missions against Taliban extremists near Kandahar, Afghanistan, as part of OEF. Since the begining of CAS missions they have focused their efforts on protecting ISAF and coalition ground forces near Kandahar and have flown more than 450 sorties and delivered more than 100 precision weapons in support of Operations Medusa and Mountain Fury.

October 23, USS Enterprise departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a five-day port call.

November 1, CVN 65 Carrier Strike Group successfully completed its second portion of operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.

November 18, USS Enterprise returned to homeport after steaming nearly 60,000 miles. During their deployment, CVW-1 aircraft delivered 65,000 pounds of ordnance, including 137 precision weapons, to provide unprecedented support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom. They completed more than 8,300 sorties, of which 2,186 were combat missions, while flying more than 22,500 hours and making 6,916 day and night arrested landings.

February 28, 2007 The "Big E" departed Naval Station Norfolk to conduct carrier qualifications in the Atlantic Ocean.

March 8, Pilots and crew members from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11 rescued a Sailor stationed aboard the Enterprise who fell overboard shortly before midnight March 6. A Sailor fell from one of the hangar bay elevators while the aircraft carrier conducted operations in the Atlantic Ocean about 100 miles off the Florida coast.

March 19, The first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed Norfolk, after spending the weekend at its homeport, offloading Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 and onloading training squadrons from Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA), headquartered at Naval Air Station (NAS) Corpus Christi, Texas. Following an initial period of carrier qualifications, the Enterprise will begin fleet replenishment carrier qualifications, providing an opportunity for pilots to become certified in landing on a carrier at sea.

April 1, CVN 65 returned to homeport, completing a two weeks of carrier qualifications.

April 30, USS Enterprise departed Norfolk for a cycle of CQ, following a four-week in port period for Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) preparations and inspections.

May 17, Adm. Gary Roughead relieved Adm. John B. Nathman as Commander U.S. Fleet Forces Command (FFC) during a change of command ceremony held aboard the "Big E" at Naval Station Norfolk.

May 18, Capt. Ron Horton relieved Capt. Lawrence Rice as CO of USS Enterprise.

May 22, CVN 65 departed homeport for two weeks of carrier qualifications in preparation for its upcoming surge deployment.

July 7, USS Enterprise CSG departed Naval Station Norfolk for a regularly scheduled deployment in support of the global war on terrorism.

July 27, USS Enterprise departed Cannes, France, after a three-day port visit. The "Big E" was the platform for a landmark event between French and U.S. navies July 23, a day before the port visit, when the ship trapped and launched two of France's multi-role combat fighters, Rafale M aircraft. It was the first time the aircraft had ever trapped aboard a U.S. aircraft carrier. Carrier Strike Group entered the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations August 1.

August 12, The Enterprise and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 started with supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom in the Persian Gulf.

October 1, Cmdr. James Linns relieved Cmdr. Mike Buchanan as the commanding officer of VAQ-137, during a change-of-command ceremony held abord the ship, in the Persian Gulf.

October 21, CVN 65 recently departed Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, after a scheduled port call.

November 13, USS Enterprise Carrier Strike Group 12 concluded a three-day, multi-unit exercise aimed at sharpening its anti-submarine warfare (ASW) skills. The aircraft carrier is currently in the Arabian Sea supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

December 1, The Enterprise CSG transited the Suez Canal after completing duties in the 5th Fleet AoO.

December 16, USS Enterprise pulled to Naval Station Mayport for a brief port stop to disembark the crew members of VMFA-251 and VS-32 "Maulers", and to pick up civilians for a three-day tiger Cruise. This was the last deployment for the S-3 Viking squadron, as the aircraft will be phased out of service at the end of 2008.

December 19, CVN 65 returned to Norfolk after a five-and-a-half month surge deployment. The aircraft from CVW 1 delivered 36,500 pounds of air-to-ground ordnance and fired more than 4,000 rounds of 20mm ammunition in support of operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. Crews flew a total of 20,300 hours and completed more than 6,500 arrest landings. In total, more than 7,500 missions were flown, 1,676 of those were combat missions.

April 11, 2008 USS Enterprise pulled to Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding for a 16-month SRA.

March 30, 2010 The U.S. Navy has awarded an additional $13.2 million contract for maintenance on the Enterprise, pushing the cost to repair the fleet's oldest aircraft carrier to $654.9 million - 44.5 percent higher than the original estimate. It's the 11th time in 21 months the service has had to throw more money at the 49-year-old ship to prepare it for two final deployments before eventually being decommissioned in 2013.

April 19, USS Enterprise returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a two-day sea trials, completing the two-year, $661.7 million worth, Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability.

April 22, CVN 65 departed homeport for an independent steaming exercise.

May 6, Capt. Owen P. Honors Jr. relieved Capt. Ron Horton as commanding officer of the Enterprise during a ceremony aboard the ship at Norfolk.

May 16, The "Big E" is currently conducting CQ in the Atlantic Ocean, with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, after completing flight deck certification May 14.

June 3, USS Enteprise is currently underway conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications off the East Coast.

July 16, The aircraft carrier recently departed Norfolk to conduct FRS-CQ in the Atlantic Ocean.

August 3, USS Enterprise departed homeport to conduct Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Period (FEP). The operations are being conducted in conjunction with carrier qualifications for CVW-1 and mark the beginning of the official work-up phase for Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12. The ship returned to Norfolk Sept. 9.

September 17, Rear Adm. Terry B. Kraft relieved Rear Adm. David H. Buss as Commander, Carrier Strike Group Twelve (CCSG-12), during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Big E.

October 5, The Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (CSG) departed for Composite Training Unit Exercise in preparation for an upcoming deployment. COMPTUEX will incorporate ships from Norway and the United Kingdom, adding multinational training to the underway environment.

December 4, USS Enterprise CSG departed Norfolk to participate in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX).

December 10, CVN 65 pulled into Mayport Naval Station for a scheduled port call.

January 4, 2011 Adm. John C. Harvey Jr., Commander, United States Fleet Forces Command, relived of duty Capt. Owen P. Honors Jr. for showing "exceptionally poor judgment" in producing and broadcasting a series of raunchy videos to his crew in 2006 and 2007, while serving as XO on USS Enterprise. Capt. Dee L. Mewbourne, former commander of the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), will take command of the ship today as Honors' permanent replacement.

January 13, USS Enterprise CSG departed Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility.

January 26, The Enterprise anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, for a three-day port visit.

February 8, The "Big E" pulled into Marmaris, Turkey, for a four-day port call.

February 15, USS Enterprise, along with USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55) and USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8), transited the Suez Canal and entered the Central Command AoO.

March 23, Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW) Vincent A. Filpi III died Tuesday aboard the Enterprise from a "non-combat related incident." The aircraft carrier is currently in the Arabian Sea supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

April 3, An SH-60F Seahawk, assigned to "Dragonslayers" of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11, successfully recovered a Sailor from USS Enterprise who went overboard at approximately 9:30 a.m. local time, while the ship was operating in the Arabian Sea.

April 16, CVN 65 departed Khalifa Bin Salman Port at Hidd after a four-day visit to Kingdom of Bahrain.

April 18, An SH-60F Sea Hawk successfully recovered a Sailor from the Enterprise, in approximately 30 minutes, who went overboard at 9 p.m. local time, while the carrier was in the Arabian Gulf.

April 19, Machinist Mate 3rd Class Micah Aaron Hill died aboard the USS Enterprise from a "non-combat related incident."

April 27, Cmdr. Daniel J. Sullivan IV relieved Cmdr. Randy C. Stearns as CO of the "Red Rippers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

May 9, The aircraft carrier recently departed Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, after a port visit to Dubai.

May 24, An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the "Red Rippers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11, piloted by Lt. Matthew L. Enos and Lt. Cmdr. Jonathan Welsh, became the 400,000th aircraft to land aboard the USS Enterprise.

June 24, CVN 65 returned to Mediterranean Sea after transiting the Suez Canal. Since entering the U.S. 5th Fleet AoR, CVW 1 has flown more than 1450 sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and Operation New Dawn in Iraq.

June 25, The "Big E" pulled into Souda Bay, Greece, for a brief port call.

June 28, USS Enterprise arrived in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a scheduled port visit.

July 13, The first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier pulled into Naval Station Mayport for a brief port call to pick up 1500 Tigers and to disembark the crew members of VMFA-251 and HS-11.

July 15, USS Enterprise returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment.

August 3, Capt. Joseph J. Leonard relieved Capt. Matthew S. Beaver as Commodore, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Enterprise at Naval Station Norfolk.

August 17, Capt. William C. Hamilton relieved Capt. Dee L. Mewbourne as 31st CO of the CVN 65 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at Norfolk.

August 25, USS Enterprise entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for safe haven from Hurricane Irene. The aircraft carrier was undergoing routine maintenance while pierside at Naval Station Norfolk.

October 6, Rear Adm. Walter E. Carter Jr. relieved Rear Adm. Terry B. Kraft as Commander, Carrier Strike Group Twelve (CCSG-12), during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Enterprise.

December 5, USS Enterprise departed Norfolk for an 11-day underway to conduct Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 and fleet replacement squadrons.

January 11, 2012 The Enterprise departed homeport for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

January 31, USS Enterprise pulled into Mayport Naval Station for a two-day port call before participating in Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) that was embedded into a largest amphibious assault exercise in the past ten years, Bold Aligator 2012 (BA12), with both the Navy and Marine Corps. The aircraft carrier returned to Norfolk Feb. 10.

March 11, USS Enterprise departed Naval Station Norfolk for its 24th and final deployment.

March 15, A Sailor aboard the "Big E" was recovered uninjured, by an SH-60F Seahawk from Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11, after falling overboard early morning, while he was working on the flight deck.

March 28, USS Enterprise anchored in Phaleron Bay, off the coast of Piraeus, for a three-day visit to Athens, Greece. The first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier returned to this ancient city after 49 years, when visited Athens in March 1963, during the first major Mediterranean deployment.

April 4, USS Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12 entered the Red Sea after transiting Suez Canal.

April 24, CVN 65 pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day visit to Dubai.

May 1, Aircraft from CVW-1 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

May 7, Cmdr. John R. Bixby relieved Cmdr. James A. McCall as CO of the "Fighting Checkmates" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Arabian Sea.

May 20, USS Enterprise pulled into Khalifa Bin Salman Port at Hidd, Bahrain, for an eight-day port call.

May 24, Vice Adm. John W. Miller relieved Vice Adm. Mark I. Fox as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command; U.S. 5th Fleet; and Combined Maritime Forces, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the "Big E."

June 8, Master Chief Petty Officer Richard J. Kessler, Jr., was found dead in his berthing compartment aboard the Enterprise.

July 1, USS Enterprise pulled again into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day port visit to celebrate the Independence Day.

July 6, Cmdr. Ryan T. Keys relieved Cmdr. Edgardo A. Moreno as CO of the "Dragonslayers" of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Arabian Gulf.

August 14, The Enterprise departed Khalifa Bin Salman Port after a four-day visit to Bahrain.

August 15, Capt. Robert D. Boyer relieved Capt. Jeffrey L. Trent as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

August 16, Cmdr. Marcus Lopez relieved Cmdr. Daniel J. Sullivan as CO of the "Red Rippers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Arabian Gulf.

August 25, USS Enterprise recently departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after its third visit to Dubai.

September 28, The "Big E" pulled into Jebel Ali for its fourth and final visit to United Arab Emirates before heading home. Entered the Red Sea on Oct. 8.

October 12, USS Enterprise CSG returned to Mediterranean after transiting Suez Canal. While in the U.S. Central Command AoO, the aircraft carrier conducted 10 Strait of Hormuz transits. Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 launched 2,241 combat sorties, delivering 56 bombs and more than 5,800 rounds of ammunition in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

October 15, Cmdr. Trevor Estes relieved Cmdr. Michael McNicholl as CO of the "Rooks" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 137, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

October 16, The Enterprise anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for a five-day port visit.

October 28, USS Enterprise transferred more than 1,500 tons of ordnance to USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2) and USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9), during its final ammunition offload in the Atlantic Ocean, from Oct. 24-26.

October 31, CVN 65 arrived in Naval Station Mayport for a two-day port call to pick up more than 1500 "Tigers" and to disembark the crew members of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 251, Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 137 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11.

November 4, USS Enterprise returned to Norfolk after a nearly eight-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

December 1, USS Enterprise was inactivated, after a 51 years of service, in a 1 p.m. EST ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk.

December 3, The Enterprise commenced a six-month Ship's Terminal Offload Program (STOP) at Naval Station Norfolk's Pier 12 in preparation for its defueling. The availability will result in the closure of nearly 3900 spaces, opening and cleaning of 800 tanks and voids, and 150 acess cuts.

June 20, CVN 65 moved "dead-stick" to Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) Newport News shipyard for a long decommissioning process to remove its nuclear fuel from 8 reactor cores before it is finally stricken from the U.S. Naval Vessel Register in 2016.

June 28, Huntington Ingalls Inc., Newport News, Va., was awarded a $745 million cost-plus-incentive-fee contract for the inactivation of USS Enterprise. Work is expected to be completed by August 2016.