USS NEBRASKA
SSBN 739
  
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The Nebraska (SSBN 739) is the 14th Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine and the second U.S. Naval ship to be named in honor of the 37th state of the Union. She incorporates the new, more quiet machinery that cannot be installed in other fleet ballistic missile submarines because of space and weight constraints. It has an advanced sonar system, comparable to that developed for the United States Navy's newest attack submarines. This sonar suite is capable of providing long-range detection and a more effective capabilities for tracking other ships or submarines. Key features of SSBN 739 include: improved maintainability, reliability, and availability resulting from modular replacement concepts of major equipment, improved design and incorporation of integrated logistics support. She has additional growth potential to accommodate future technology as it becomes available, both in ship systems and in larger missiles. High patrol speeds will greatly increase ocean operating area, providing the ability to avoid potential enemies, thus enhancing survivability.

The contract to build the was awarded on May 26, 1987, to General Dynamics. The keel was laid on July 6, 1987, and she was launced on August 15, 1992. The ship’s sponsor was Mrs. Patricia Pros Exon. SSBN 739 was delivered to the U.S. Navy on June 18, 1993, and was commissioned on July 10, 1993.

August 20, 1993 USS Nebraska (Blue) successfully launched one Trident II (D5) missile during a Demonstration and Shakedown Operation.

November 18, The Gold Crew of SSBN 739 successfully launched one Trident II missile during a Demonstration and Shakedown Operation. This was the last new construction Trident submarine to conduct two firing DASOs.

May 28, 1994 The Nebraska completed its strategic loadout at Strategic Weapons Facility, Atlantic, Kings Bay, Ga. First patrol began June 26.

January 19, 1995 USS Nebraska successfully launched two Trident II missiles during a Follow-on CINC Evaluation Test.

USS Nebraska (Blue) conducted its 12th strategic deterrent patrol from June to October 1997. She transited more than 16,800 miles, crossing the Atlantic Ocean, and navigating the Mediterranean Sea to her mid-patrol destination of the Greek island of Crete. The submarine had been at sea nearly two months, and had patrolled thousands of miles of both the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, when she surfaced to enter her destination and liberty port, Souda Bay, Crete.

February 26, 2004 SSBN 739 successfully launched two D5 missiles during a Follow-on Commander Evaluation Test.

August 12, USS Nebraska departed Kings Bay, Georgia, for its new homeport in Bangor, Washington.

October 20, USS Nebraska (Gold), commanded by Cmdr. Christopher Haugen, arrived for the first time in Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor. She is the third Trident submarine in as many years to leave Kings Bay for the Pacific Fleet. The move is part of the Navy’s goal of balancing the Atlantic and Pacific Trident fleets at seven boats each. The Navy will decommission its four oldest Ohio-class submarines, USS Ohio (SSBN 726), USS Florida (SSBN 728), USS Michigan (SSBN 727) and USS Georgia (SSBN 729) during the next several years, and then overhaul and convert them from fleet ballistic missile submarines (SSBN) to guided-missile submarines (SSGN).

January 6, 2005 Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Aaron Scrimiger hanged himself in the machinery spaces while the ship was in Bangor.

September 20, 2008 Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class (SS) Michael Gentile was killed after being "entangled and pinned" as he worked on the rudder machinery while the submarine was conducting operations near the island of Oahu, Hawaii.

October 16, 2009 Cmdr. Michael Fisher relieved Cmdr. Carl Lahti as CO of the Nebraska (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor.

April 19, 2010 Machinist’s Mate Fireman William Mack was found dead in the submarine’s berthing spaces while the ship was underway in the Pacific Ocean. USS Nebraska departed Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor for a normal deterrence patrol March 18.

January 1, 2011 SSBN 739 (Gold) returned to homeport after a 88-day strategic deterrent patrol.

July 30, USS Nebraska (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., following a strategic deterrent patrol.

December 10, USS Nebraska (Blue) returned to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor following a strategic deterrent patrol.

April 12, 2012 USS Nebraska (Gold) returned to homeport after a 69-day strategic deterrent patrol.

July 27, Cmdr. Jeffrey A. Joseph relieved Cmdr. Michael Fisher as CO of the SSBN 739 (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor's Deterrent Park.

August 12, USS Nebraska (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., after a 93-day strategic deterrent patrol.

November 13, The Nebraska (Gold) returned to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor after a 59-day strategic deterrent patrol.

June 6, 2013 USS Nebraska (Blue), commanded by Cmdr. Jason D. Wartell, returned to homeport following a strategic deterrent patrol.

Octobrer 4, USS Nebraska (Gold) returned to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor after a 105-day strategic deterrent patrol.

November 21, Capt. Jeffrey A. Joseph relieved Cmdr. Jason D. Wartell as CO of the Nebraska (Green) during a crew combination ceremony at the Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor. The approximate 300 Sailors assigned to the two crews merge into one crew of about 110 sailors during the two-year Engineered Refueling Overhaul (ERO), which will be done at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash.

October 17, 2014 Capt. Jason M. Geddes relieved Capt. Jeffrey A. Joseph as CO of the USS Nebraska (Green) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor's Deterrent Park.

March 8, 2016 SSBN 739 undocked after more than a two-year in Dry Dock #4 and moored at Pier 3 on PSNS&IMF.

June 9, 2017 USS Nebraska moored at Delta Pier South on Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor after a week-long underway for sea trials.